1. You better be good…

When I was in my 4th grade, I witnessed my father getting incredibly wasted around Christmas time. While my parents argued, I was trying to sleep. After hearing a loud crash, I came out to find my dad in the Christmas tree, knocking it over and breaking some ornaments. Things were messy. Mom slammed the door as she stormed to bed. After laying there for a while, my dad vomited. After helping my dad up, I got cleaning supplies to clean his vomit. My eyes welled up with tears. As I was crying, my dad began to yell at me and he started crying as well, and he started telling me about the terrible things that happened to him when he was a kid, and how wonderful my life is.

As I left for school the following morning, I was exhausted and overwhelmed, and I had forgotten my book report at home. The teacher sent me to the school counselor because I couldn’t hold back the tears. She listened to me as I told her about the horrific night. My blood froze when she replied. As I looked at her, she said, “Well that is horrible, but I know some little girls’ daddies party all night long.” “That’s really bad,” she continued. Every time this happened, people would come pick you up and take you away from your family. You would then have to live with foster parents! Surely that would be worse.” My mind raced as I thought about it. The words “really bad” and “foster care” were bouncing around in my head as I prepared to address my dad’s problems and how they were affecting me.As a result, I just nodded and didn’t say anything else. After that, I spent about four years in an emotional wreck. The loneliest feeling as a kid is to have a secret that you feel you must carry alone, and if discovered, you’ll be separated from your family. Alateen saved my life in 8th grade when my mom took me there.

2. Family always comes first

In my counseling practice, I worked with a 13-year-old girl suffering from severe anxiety. She told me that she was being abused by her stepfather during one of our sessions. I called her mom the moment our session ended and said I needed to contact child protective services. When her mother replied, I was stunned. I learned that CPS was aware of the situation because it was first reported when the patient was around seven years old.

Yes, that’s correct. Even though she knew what was happening, her mother stayed with the man who was abusing her. Although it seemed complicated, it wasn’t. Her mother couldn’t have done more for her daughter! I’m sorry, but I’m judging.

3. Got somewhere else to be

As a mental health professional, I work in crisis management. I once worked with a young person who was dealing with a lot of emotional pain and was experiencing ongoing suicidal ideation. As we moved forward, we discussed de-escalation strategies and developed a mental health management plan. In my line of work, such situations are not uncommon. I had not yet encountered their parents, however.

I talked to one of their parents about what had been going on with their child. Naturally, I had the child’s consent to tell the parent about our sessions. The parent said something that made my jaw drop halfway through my explanation of the child’s psychological challenges and ways he or she could help. In fact, they asked me, “I apologize for interrupting, but how long will this take?” I have a show to watch.” In all honesty, I don’t judge my patients. The world has never been seen through their eyes or walked their path. My judgment goes to those who perpetuate their suffering out of ignorance, malice, and selfishness.

4. If only I had a better therapist back then

My parents kicked me out when I was 17 years old because of my bisexuality and dating a girl. However, this girl was pretty horrible as well. This relationship caused me to be deeply depressed and anxious. As a result, I went to my college’s therapist, who told me women aren’t abusers.Then, after I countered with examples, she scoffed, saying it “mustn’t be as bad as it seems if I didn’t leave.” Yep, classic blame the victim. She then requested payment. In hindsight, I was scared and without any support system, and frantically trying to find someone who could help me mentally prepare to leave this girl.

However, the “therapist” made me feel like I was worthless, weak, and stupid. Because of this, I remained in a relationship that only became increasingly dangerous. Five years went by, even though the relationship was only getting worse. Eventually, I realized it, but she caused so much damage. The time would have been better spent with a better therapist than the one I had.

5. Evil doctor

In my case, my husband and I attended a family counseling program offered by the Department of Veteran Affairs. It was a terrible dynamic at this time, and I was feeling the effects. During the first session, I cried, and the counselor suggested taking meds for depression. She stated that we could resume sessions with each other only once I was medicated.

During this time period, she would only counsel my husband. On their first meeting, my husband was visibly upset. It was horrifying to hear his confession, even though he didn’t want to discuss it. During their session, the counselor actually suggested that they book a hotel together. Then she explained that her husband was a high-ranking executive who was always busy, so she could do whatever she wanted. She was turned over to the VA after my husband took off. The woman made a veiled threat that her husband might ruin my husband’s medical retirement status, which scared him. She was aggressive and vile. One wonders how many men or marriages she ruined.

6. Putting up for the holidays

Before we ended things, my ex and I scheduled an appointment for couple’s therapy. Despite the fact that we were over, she still wanted to go to the appointment for closure. It was the holiday season, and she had been pressuring me about whether I would be spending Christmas with her family. However, I was hesitant to commit. Because we weren’t together, we would have to pretend that we were still together for her family since she wanted to tell them after the holidays. As if things weren’t messy enough, things were about to take a jaw-dropping turn.

She mentioned the whole Christmas thing to me during our counseling session, saying she needed me there. I told her that was stupid, that I didn’t want to pretend we were together, and that the whole thing was weird. “Of course, I’m right,” my ex said to the therapist. Don’t you agree? My ex still hates her. She laughed out loud and went red, then apologized for being unprofessional. I kept her. I like the way she thinks, honestly.

7. Good greif

Previously, I worked at a mental hospital. It’s pretty hard to judge anyone once you’ve watched someone go from raving about hurting their dog for their waffles to being a completely “normal” person in no time. However, this woman stands out as being special for me. She had suicidal thoughts and was experiencing depression. The mother had been drinking and driving with her 17-year-old son in the car. They crashed into a tree, and her son wasn’t able to survive. I did not know him even though he was from my town. In the early days, the woman stayed in her room, but over the next few days, she began to visit the common areas.

After that, she gained a lot of friends and became obnoxious and loud. After consulting her doctors, she was granted a one-day pass to attend her son’s funeral. In the days before the funeral, she was joking with her new friends. I overheard her saying she’d skipped her son’s funeral when she returned from her day off. Instead, she went to record an intimate video with her boyfriend. Although they say you can never really understand a person’s grief, I felt compelled to tell that woman to screw off.

8. Physical health is just as important

Several years after struggling with my eating disorder, my therapist came to a point where she yelled at me that I needed to accept it. I was given a diet with all the things I hate to eat and instructed not to come back for a month. My reason for hating eating the foods on the list was not that I had an eating disorder, but that eating them made me feel bad.

There were foods such as acidic ones, high-protein foods, and peanuts on the list. My digestive disorders, a long list of sensitivities, and allergies were diagnosed four months later, and I got declared disabled. I was gently reprimanded by my doctors for following my therapist’s demand because it caused esophageal bleeding and a slight scarring. It’s clear that my doctor is angry with her for ignoring what wasn’t a mental health issue. She changed therapists for me.

9. Dirty protest

Honestly, I do not think much shocks me, and it is difficult to judge my patients based on what they do. Nevertheless, I have to admit that on my first day in the office I felt somewhat judgmental when a new patient walked in and threw a cup of pee and a poo at me immediately.

As I tried to think objectively and stay calm, the thought that crossed my mind was, “what a jerk.”. Not the best first day on the job. Needless to say this patient was passed over to another therapist in my unit and I was given a replacement in his place. Amen.

10. Addicted beyond belief

It was my first time seeing a therapist who was specialized in addictions. He had been doing his job for decades by that point, so he knew instantly when I walked into his office that I had some serious business on my hands.

However, after he heard about my typical intake, he lost his calm, and it became a bit tense. His jaw dropped and he actually said, “Holy moly, how are you even still alive? !” It was the most honest question I have ever heard a therapist ask. I don’t know how I am still alive!

11. What privacy?

Due to some really intense events happening in my life, I was really difficult in high school. My family home was extremely rough, and I withdrew as a result. The teachings did not make it home from my parents, however, as they were “Sunday Christians” at church. Our phones, our bags, and rooms were always being searched, and they gave us no sense of privacy. Our lives were just controlled by them if they offered them control. I was told I knew them personally after they “found me a counsellor.” In the end, I ended up going to therapy with the PASTOR’S WIFE. It became crystal clear that she was telling them the same things we talked about, but I didn’t have any proof that she was speaking the truth.

Eventually, I had had enough and decided to catch them in the act. Ultimately, I told my therapist I was involved in a fender bender. When I arrived home, my father demanded to see my bumpers, as she told her parents immediately when I left. They looked good. Despite what happened, my parents never forced me to go again, so at least that’s good.

12. Every cloud

As we worked together, he told me about his history as a drug lord. While I worked in a rehabilitation center, there was a client who checked in and told me that he was a “drug lord.”. He told me something quite shocking. I saw him sell his sister to the slave traders. The people “taught her a lesson” by forcefully injecting her with sedatives and narcotics.

It never occurred to him to explain what that meant. Then he smiled when he spoke of the “good times,” meaning when he had enough drugs to get through each day. At this point, I am unaware of where he is. I am not interested in knowing. Even though this was a disturbing conversation with a horrible man, it had a positive side. Because of my experiences, I wanted to work with human trafficking victims because they face not only the stigma of “selling their bodies,” but also addiction issues. I think people would be shocked if they knew how many people’s addictions started because they were forced to accept something.

13. An artist misunderstood

Several therapists attempted to read into my sketches and doodles. My pencil drawing was a realistic fish, which I was quite proud of. It has been described as a large, silent fish, scaled, armored, or walled off, without anyone to interact with.

The fish doesn’t really catch my attention, and it wasn’t colored, so I assumed all the color had left my world. My main purpose in practicing drawing realistic images was to distract myself from my anxiety over not being accepted to a post secondary school at the time.

14. Care home issues

I work for a residential group home. A child admitted to our hospital four months earlier had admitted to having parasites during a family interview. It surprised me. I heard her say, “Oh yes, we have them all.”. As part of our biological ecosystem, we don’t think it’s right to get rid of them.

During the next three weeks, the family believed that other residents were eating feces and had other unsanitary issues that could spread disease. I devoted three weeks to teaching, planning, and, most importantly, persuading the kid and his mother that their IQ would not fall.

15. No problem

In a meeting where I was discussing how my notes were behind, I mentioned that I just found out I suffer from severe ADHD. I spent the past month getting medicated, learning about the diagnosis, and figuring out what strategies and systems I can work with. While waving her hand in my face, the clinical director stopped me in the middle of my explanation.

The woman said, “I don’t want to hear any of that, that’s your business.”. “I am interested in your notes.” I was shocked, because it was an explanation about my notes AND my plan to stay on track.

16. Attention seeking to the highest order

There was an employee with whom I worked who liked the attention so much that she would purposefully get pregnant in order to enjoy it. Despite sounding crazy a lot of women have this. However this was a different case.

Upon having a child, she would immediately dump it in the care of the foster system or, in one instance, just leave the baby with a family member who was willing to take them in. The last time I saw her, she had already given birth to six children.

17. The worst dating advice

A former partner who attempted to hurt me after I left him caused PTSD symptoms in me, so I went to a psychiatrist. Next, he stalked me, forced his way into my apartment, and attempted to force himself on me. I was counseled by an older man psychiatrist on how to better represent myself as feminine and demure.

It turns out that “quality men” weren’t interested in women who looked and behaved like me, so I shouldn’t try to get involved in another relationship without making myself more attractive to “quality men” first, otherwise I will end up right back where I started. After that, I dropped him like a hot potato.

18. Young and free

After graduating from high school, I was very depressed. My mom and stepdad were horribly dysfunctional and I had no friends. Mental health problems run in my family, so I gave in after being pushed to seek help. A one-hour assessment was scheduled. After 20 minutes, I was done.

“Every young person goes through these things”, she said, dismissing me for being young. I was admitted to therapy after just my second visit this time around, which was totally normal because everyone worries about their future. It took me three years to return to therapy after having left it for three years. Go with what you feel and talk to someone who listens.

19. Pick one son…

The child with whom I was working had both a severe mood disorder and had made and attempted to commit both suicidal and homicidal acts. Obviously this was a serious condition and I spent several hours dealing with this particular patient.

As I mentioned to the parents, I did not think buying the child a firearm was a good idea…especially after spending our session talking about how she fears the child will harm her. I never seen them again.

20. Fear the wrath

I was a virgin when I was in my early 20’s, and I was really upset by it. When I asked my therapist about this, she showed me pictures of STDs. Oh, but there was more to it than that. One in three people have STDs, according to her, because they are God’s punishment for immoral behaviour.

In response to my question about condoms, she told me that condoms could not protect me from God’s anger. After that, she prayed I would remain a virgin until marriage, and that I would no longer commit sins. In retrospect, I should have reported her to a license board for therapists. Approximately a year later, I still had no STDs despite getting plenty of action. God must not be angry with me enough.

21. Never see it coming

One of the ladies had many issues, including a tragic childhood. She eventually fell in with a man who mistreated her severely. Her child was born. To her, the child was everything. She took him everywhere she went. Sadly, this meant that the little boy had to watch his mother suffer. Her boyfriend even locked her in a cage. This is unimaginable…

Thankfully, the mother got out and is now doing much better. During that kid’s childhood, he saw everything, and that kind of damage cannot be reversed. Such a terrible cycle should not continue onto the next generation, especially when this kid was an innocent bystander. I still cry thinking about this even after dealing with it years ago.

22. Don’t belittle your patients

A “ADHD specialist” was helping me understand my crippling executive dysfunction and lifelong inattentiveness issues. “You make good eye contact and are engaging, interesting in conversation, so your problems aren’t bad enough,” he told me during our sessions. Clearly, you don’t have ADHD.”

The doctor kept saying, “My other patients are addicts who lack direction in life.”. How could you possibly compare your problems to theirs? It seems everyone with attention disorders are delinquents. I don’t think it’s fair to throw your other patients under the bus, who are presumably coming to you for help with their demons.

23. Leave him… YESTERDAY

I visited a client in the emergency room when I worked in crisis management. My client’s boyfriend had been charged with sex crimes. If she were to be with him, her mother and best friend told her that they wouldn’t contact her. When the client was with her boyfriend, her mother refused to let her see her children.

Her boyfriend and many fights led to her being in the ER feeling suicidal. Every two weeks or so, she would be in the ER feeling that way. Her boyfriend was the cause of all of her problems, she said while talking. Despite all of this, she insisted she wouldn’t leave. My personal rule is not to direct anyone. I am not in the position to do so. The purpose of my job is to outline the choices they have and explain the consequences of those choices. This was the first time I wanted to break the rules, shake her, and tell her to leave her boyfriend YESTERDAY.

24. Dating your doctor

A nurse became close to me while I was on a mental health ward for a month. I got her number after I left the ward and we hit it off right away. After we began dating, I realized how secretive she was. After I discovered she was doing this to other patients, too, she formed relationships with them afterwards.

She blocked me on everything as soon as she found out I knew. After two DUIs and an addiction, I haven’t been able to recover. It isn’t her fault that she did what she did, but I became dependent upon her and felt loved. This betrayed the trust I had in her. She is still a nurse in mental health care.

25. Know your own mind

My anxiety was worsened by the drugs I was given. My therapist had given me the same kind of medication for years, even though I was having bad reactions to it. When I told him about the bad side effects of all the medication he had prescribed me, he took it very personally.

Are you giving up now?””” he asked. “Do you just want to be like this the rest of your life?” Obviously not, that’s why I’m in this office trying new medications! It was ironic that I had a panic attack in his office that very day because I was so angry. Eventually, I walked out and found a new psychiatrist, and things are much better now.

26. Wood Work

My therapist worked in a prison one day, and they were teaching health education to inmates. In the course, they practiced on, let’s say, suggestively shaped wooden implements to teach them how to use protection.

A few pieces went missing after the lesson, according to my therapist. There were no further questions for me. Prisons are such a strange and intriguing place and sometimes it is better just not knowing.

27. Poker face

We discussed how to recognize facial expressions with my therapist. It turned out I was significantly better than the average at reading facial expressions than I had thought.

However, I was still diagnosed with autism, and my therapist told me, “You will never be able to have normal social relationships. Other people will always need to adjust to you.” Despite what my therapist said, I’ve never had any problems with social situations.

28. Maybe it’s not over

As a more invested partner than she was, I caused my ex to break up with me. It was a totally fine thing to do, but my shrink told me that “Your ex-girlfriend is acting this way because she wants to get back together with you, and if you hang in there I’m sure she will.” This is bad advice, and I went along with it.

My therapist actively encouraged me to believe that any minute we would be reunited, and I spent a whole year believing that. What a nightmare. My ex and I are actually pretty good friends now that, after a year of tormenting ourselves with these fantasies, I dumped the therapist. I lost a year of my life then.

29. First world problems

Sometimes I judge my patients, but not the ones with serious problems. Unfortunately, these are real quotes from clients who have said, “I’m so upset that my husband only lets me have $10k a month for shopping,” “My kid gets B grades, and I’m so upset.”

Another one has been “I’m so depressed that my favorite show is no longer on.” Yeah, you don’t really have problems. Why waste money and time on therapy for this. Get a grip!

30.

While I was lying in bed in my underwear at least six times, I had a male therapist enter my room while I was naked and tell me to get up. This occurred between the ages of 18 and 20 and with a number of different therapists.

Instead of leaving immediately after I said no, they would stay and try to persuade me. After I continued to refuse, this nurse went to the head therapist, and I had to attend several appointments to discuss “not cooperating in therapy.”

31. Leave a bad taste

When I was about 20, I had my first psychotherapist, who was super into astrology. Her “purple room” was where she calculated your birth time and planets’ relation, etc. There was also an additional charge of like $500 for it. However, that wasn’t the worst part.

One day, my pap results were abnormal. It worried me. According to her, my tongue ring was causing my abnormal paps. She told me some stories about my chakras. This annoyed me to no end. I had no idea what to expect from a psychologist until she told me. Years later, I did not seek appropriate treatment because I believed, “What’s the point, they’re crazier than me.”

32. A mans job

Her therapist asked my daughter, 16, a few months ago, whether she was planning to go to college after high school. She has been encouraged to consider trade jobs or careers by me, who works in the trade industry. As a result of my example, my daughter decided to take a welder training course.

Her therapist said, “You don’t want to do that; that is a man’s responsibility.”. It will be hot and you’ll ruin your makeup.” My daughter told her, “I don’t wear makeup,” and ended the session. She then called me at work to tell me all about it, almost in tears. As soon as she told me, she canceled her next three appointments and switched counsellors.

33. Hitting a nerve

I have a wife who is a therapist at a state correctional facility. It is only when someone strikes a nerve in her that she judges them, usually because they remind her of an insecurity she has experienced in her own life. An addict said, for instance, that the world was against him and that he had done nothing wrong.

As he talked about all the amazing things he planned to do when he got out of jail, her whole attitude was really off-putting. After she told me about the guy and how troubled she was with him, I was like, “He sounds like your brother.” Not to get into it, but her brother wasn’t a great person. Her response to the client made sense after that.

34. Time to quit

Because of my perfectionist nature in school, I told my counselor I was getting worried I was going to relapse into anorexia during my sophomore year of nursing school. When I did not get 93% on an assignment, I felt I didn’t deserve to eat and would restrict myself. It’s admirable how high standards you hold yourself to, and I really admire your hard work.”

She replied. I look forward to seeing you in the future.” She was definitely seeing me for the final time that day. I spoke to her as she was packing up her things to leave behind her desk.

35.  A face that is familiar

My first session with a therapist was pretty good, and I felt connected to him right away. When I came in two weeks later, she said, “You look so familiar. “I feel like we have met before.” She hadn’t realized that we had already had a session.

I felt that my family would often forget me, and it took them a long time to get to know me. This was one of the things I was struggling with. But I am now learning to deal with it much better.

36. Pure evil

A client admitted hurting his neighbor’s dog with pellets just for fun, and I judged him. Adding insult to injury, he wasn’t just any neighbor. He knew them. He had been watching their dogs while they were on vacation.

When the family came home, they found a dog that was very sick, and when they took him to the vet, the vet discovered that the dog was full of BB pellets. How sick can you be?

37. Keep your nose out

As I described my insane amount on my mins in our session, my therapist said, “I think you should have another child.” She said that to me after we talked about how stressed I was. I have been living my life in the shadow of doctors since my teenage son had emergency brain surgery a year ago.

In my 40s, I had only one child jointly decided with my husband, and the therapist was already aware of that. Now, I see a different therapist. Her comments about having children drove me away.

38. Blatantly oblivious

During the initial consultation, a gentleman sat down and said, “I’ll get right to the point, Doc.”. I’ve been married five times. My question is, since I know I’m obviously not the problem, what does it take to find a decent woman in this world?”

All this he said without a sense of humor, without a hint of irony, nothing. Everything he said was utterly serious. Safe to say therapy wasn’t the answer for him. This was his last session with me.

39. A bridge too far

When I was single and struggling with living on my own, this happened to me. She became so concerned for me that she asked me to come live with her. There were two other adopted daughters living with her.

As a 19-year-old I was probably breaking every rule of patient-doctor boundaries. As a result, I very quickly switched doctors after feeling uncomfortable with that physician.

40. Game On

While volunteering, I had the opportunity to interact with patients at a psychiatric hospital. We had to make sure we had no knowledge of their past activities before admission. Typically, the less we know about them, the harder it is to judge them. There’s no doubt that the people in the building came from a dark past.

Midway through a basketball game, a resident stopped to say something to me. He came over to me and said, “I’m in here because I sedated my wife and kid and then burned my house down before pleading insanity.” I have never had such intense goosebumps in my entire life. As he played on, he yelled game on as if nothing had happened.

41. Chemical attraction

It was told to me that, with medication, I would become straight, and then I would be OK. She wasn’t a psychiatrist, and couldn’t prescribe me medication, but she encouraged me many times to have my hormones tested, which were all normal. According to her, if I wasn’t chemically gay, then I must have experienced trauma with a man in order to be gay.

I told her I was fine with men, I loved my dad as much as I could, and I never had any trauma with a man. I know that she received complaints from other clients as well because she was cold and unable to deal with people’s emotions. Fortunately, I switched psychologists eventually, and during our time together I was too distraught to really take in what the old therapist had to say and to apply her advice. It was a terrible beginning to therapy. I was fourteen years old.

42. Caught brown handed

As a young person, I worked in a residential treatment facility for children under 18 years of age. An incredibly severe case of schizophrenia was diagnosed on a 15-year-old patient, but he was too young to receive a formal diagnosis. Despite the fact that he was not diagnosed, he didn’t receive the treatment he needed. The kid was built like a tank, even though he was young. Even the tiniest things could not stop him from beating adults. One guy was injured because he was not an Aries. He needed to have his face completely rebuilt.

I also remember the time at a community meeting when everyone smelled poo. Since one kid was known for having accidents, the staff wanted to speak with him. He was sent to clean up after the meeting. When pressed, he denied being responsible for the smell. However, as he began to walk to his room, a piece of poop fell from his jeans. Crazy times.

43. Simple instructions

My marriage was in a bad place at the time, so I visited a marriage counselor. Across from the office was a sign saying, “Do not knock.”. “Sit here until someone comes to get you,” or something like that. My wife knocked on the door while I was standing near the door. I told her, “There’s a sign that says don’t do that!“ So she returned to her seat.

I stood there, and the therapist knew I was standing there, as if I had knocked at the door. All she did was abuse me. The lady even talked behind my back about me when I left the room after I walked out. That left me shaken. It was disrespectful to treat patients that way, so I refused to pay. That was the worst time of my life.

44. What is wrong with me

My specialty is working with autistic children as a behavioural therapist. In no way do I judge them. However, I was shocked once when I worked with a seven-year-old who was having a tantrum. He asked me to sit next to him and hold his hand because he wanted me by his side. As he was crying, he stopped for a moment.

Then he asked, “What’s wrong with me? Why am I like this? Why am I so useless?” This kid was freaking smart. He could tell you pretty much anything about the solar system. One time, I randomly asked him, “Hey, how far is Jupiter from the earth?” He answered without hesitation. I looked it up, and he was right. This made me feel very sad.

45. Women, are you right?

My experience with this doctor was very unpleasant, given that it was a volunteer clinic that accepted donations as payment. I’m sure he had a good intention, but it just wasn’t working out. The first time, I asked my husband if he could come with me since I do struggle with being around strangers. I mentioned I was bipolar to the doctor as she asked me questions.

After looking at my husband, she said, “Wow, I feel sorry for this guy.”. It must feel like your wife is going through her monthly cycle all the time.” Long story short, I left and never went back.

46. Do no harm first

I was told by a psychiatrist that hormone replacement therapy would ruin my body after I started it. I was scared to make the wrong decision, so I was hesitant to make that decision. I couldn’t sleep or eat for a few days after the psychiatrist poked her finger in my wound.

In order to function normally again, I had to take Lorazepam for weeks. It is strange that even though I worried a lot before, I never had an anxiety disorder. After just five appointments, I discovered that other mental health professionals knew me better than she did.

47. I can hear things

I work in crisis management. During a crisis with a teen experiencing suicidal ideation, I tried de-escalating the situation. The whole deranged discussion between her and her mother was heard by me since I was standing alongside her. Despite the fact that her dad walked out on her as a baby, and despite her mother’s apparent lack of concern for her, she told her to go for it.

The feeling of shock was overwhelming. In another instance, I spoke to the mother when the girl was experiencing a crisis. While she was at work, she called her daughter and asked if she could come down and support her. When that evil woman walked into my room, it took everything I had not to start yelling at her. I can hardly look the mother in the eye when we meet later.

48. Beliefs in question

My goal was to find a therapist who was trained and specialized in treating ADHD patients. A therapist who specialized in ADHD was listed on her website as my therapist. We set up an appointment, and began talking. When I mentioned the difficulties I had with my ADHD symptoms, she said, “I don’t believe in ADHD.”. I think it was made up to sell more pills.”

This shocked me to the core. I thought, “What?” Are you joking? Specifically, your website stated that your specialty was ADHD.””” Instead of arguing with her though, I just got up and left. The session wasn’t even charged to me. I think it was at the very least false advertising, and potentially quite harmful.

49. Why did I listen?

In addition to being pregnant, my then-husband was not a good person. While I was out of the house, he called me and asked me to come home. My friend wanted to go with me because he sounded odd. Despite being wasted, he displayed aggressive, violent tendencies. Ultimately he fired a shot at me.

Fortunately, he missed. After an hour-long standoff, the authorities were able to take him down. The psychiatrist who treated him afterwards told me not to leave him as he wouldn’t cope. Unfortunately, they did succeed in guilting me into staying, but I got out a few years later and gave my kid an awesome life.

50. Far too beautiful

A doctor told me, “Don’t transition” as I was leaving a psychiatric ward. I find that you have many attractive feminine features that I personally find very attractive. You would ruin that! ” We were in a room with a lock that could not be opened from the outside without a key. I had not yet begun my transition, and I was not there for that purpose.

Then I left the hospital and his office swiftly. It was later revealed that my experience was “mild” when it came to the treatment of any queer person there. I had a lucky escape thankfully, although it didnt feel that way!